Section 7 Villages Population < 500

opendate_range12 Jan, 2021, 9:00am - 23 Mar, 2021, 5:00pm

7.   VILLAGES < 500 POPULATION

Note: Please click on the links to supporting zoning maps to the right under Materials.

7.1      BALLYBRITTAS

Population

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

% Increase/Decrease

388

331

+17%

Housing Stock

 

2016 Census

Vacancy

135

16

Infrastructure

Water

Waste Water

 

 

Servicing Road Network

Broadband

Borehole in Killenard

Ballybrittas has a shared wastewater infrastructure, which connects to Killenard and is pumped from there to Portarlington.

R445

Partially serviced and remaining areas serviced under the National Broadband Plan

Social Infrastructure

School

Church

 

Sporting Facilities

Other

Nearest NS in Rath (2km S/E)

Nearest RC is ST John’s in Killenard (2.5km N)

Nearest GAA pitch O Dempsey’s Old Pound (1.5km N)

Public House, local shop and petrol station, crèche, a number of various enterprises

Environment/Heritage

Conservation

Flooding

Derries Wood pNHA

Not Applicable

Cultural Heritage

Protected Structures

2 Protected Structures

Sustainable Transport

Bus Services

Cycle Routes

24hr Airport Bus from Portlaoise to Dublin Airport

NA

7.1.1  CHARACTER AND CONTEXT

Ballybrittas village is located on the old N8 Cork-Dublin road, now the R445, approximately 1 km from Junction 15 of the M7. The village formed around a cross roads where development is located in a linear pattern along the R445 with dispersed pockets radiating from the village core. It has a heterogeneous building stock with a large housing estate located on the northern perimeter of the village and one off dwellings located on all other approaches. The village has a strong economic base for a settlement of its size where a number of enterprise developments are also located on the northern and southern approach to the village.

In terms of community facilities, the village lacks a number of key social infrastructure components, however a number of facilities are located in nearby Rath, Killenard and Old Pound, including a national school, church and a community centre. One of the main amenity areas serving the village is Derries Wood (pNHA) which consists of a 9 acre lake set in extensive woodland area. Derries Wood is located less than 1km north east of Ballybrittas village core.

7.1.2  REGENERATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Housing Land Requirements

Ballybrittas has been the subject of substantial residential development between 2006 and 2011 where there was an increase in population of 56%. Between 2011 and 2016, the village experienced 6% growth. Only natural residential growth shall be facilitated over the period of this Plan, having regard to the household allocation in the Core Strategy where 12 units shall be accommodated.

A review of extant planning permissions within the town has determined that there are no committed units. All new residential development shall be accommodated to the south of the village centre which consolidates with existing residential development.

Due to its location on in proximity to Portarlington, Portlaoise and the M7, the hinterlands of Ballybrittas has experienced high urban generated rural development and is therefore designated an Area Under Strong Urban Influence in the rural typology of the County. Sufficient land has been zoned to accommodate residential development which could also provide essential opportunity to develop serviced site to accommodate New Homes in Small Towns and Villages initiative.

Village Centre Regeneration

The village core has a number of vacant units, both commercial and residential which require regeneration to strengthen the function of the village core and provide vital and strengthened community functions and social infrastructure for the surrounding population.

Opportunity sites have been identified for regeneration to promote a compact village settlement with a defined village core indicated in Fig 7.1.  Opportunity Site 1 is an existing vacant public house and associated outbuildings (0.17ha) within the heart of the village centre. This site is zoned for village centre uses and could be refurbished for example as community enterprise or remote working hub. Opportunity Site 2 is a derelict site with single storey structure on a site of 0.13ha. This site is also zoned for village centre purposes and could be used for additional village services or for residential purposes.

Fig 7.1: Opportunity Sites

Social and Economic Development

The area has seen substantial development pressure for one off dwellings in recent years as a result of the growth of surrounding towns and the opening of the M7 motorway, which places Ballybrittas in a unique strategic location to capture its share of economic and social development. It has been identified in the analysis of the social infrastructure within the village, there is a clear requirement for additional community and recreation facilities for the large population base which could be accommodated as a regeneration opportunity in Site 1 or within the community/enterprise zoning.

Land has beEn zoned for enterprise and employment uses on the eastern limits of the village which can also accommodate community and recreation uses.

7.1.3  WRITTEN OBJECTIVES

Built Environment and Regeneration

BB1        Encourage the maintenance of buildings and encourage the regeneration of key derelict, vacant or underused village centre buildings noted as opportunity sites 1 and 2 on Map 7.1(b) as appropriate;

BB2        Provision of landscaping and biodiversity planting and street trees along the main street of the village;

BB3        Support the development of serviced sites under the New Homes in Small Towns and Villages Initiative in lands identified as Residential 2;

 

Economic and Community Development

BB4        Harness the potential of the villages’ accessibility to the M7 through the appropriate development of lands for enterprise and employment, general business and industrial development subject to proper planning and sustainable development design and standards;

BB5        Facilitate the expansion of village core appropriate to scale of development and expand the range of social and community services and facilities, available to residents and the wider rural hinterland subject to planning development and design standards;

BB6        Support the development of remote working opportunities within the village core;

 

Infrastructure

BB7        Provide footpath and cycle path within the village centre and to the residential housing estates and the lands zoned for community use;

BB8        Provide pedestrian crossing within the village centre in association with the above pedestrian and cycle linkages and also with reference to the bus stop;

BB9        Upgrade existing bus stop and provide associated disabled parking and cycle stands within the village core;

BB10      Develop linked areas of public open space and provide safe cycle walking route to Derries Wood.

 

7.2      BALLINAKILL

Population

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

% Increase/Decrease

445

438

1.5%

Housing Stock

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

398

444

Infrastructure

Water

Waste Water

 

Servicing Road Network

Broadband

Public Water - Donaghmore Borehole

Waste Water Treatment Plant (Additional capacity of 229 PE)

R432

Serviced

Social Infrastructure

Schools

Church

Sporting Facilities

Other

St Joseph’s NS (enrolment 106)

St Canice’s Catholic Church

GAA grounds, swimming pool, fishing lake

Public House, Garda station, pharmacy, restaurant, shop, post office, machinery outlet, petrol station and shop

Environment

Conservation

 

 

Flooding

River Barrow/Nore flows to the immediate east of the village. Although not a conservation area, Mass Lough is located to the east within walking distance of village centre

Not Applicable

Cultural Heritage

Protected Structures

Monuments

13 Protected Structures

6 National Monument

Sustainable Transport

Public Transport

Laois Link – twice weekly to Portlaoise

7.2.1  CHARACTER AND CONTEXT

Ballinakill is a picturesque village in south Laois, located on the R432 between the heritage town of Abbeyleix and Ballyragget village in Co Kilkenny. The village has a unique character created by the interaction of the traditional architecture, a linear streetscape with village square and its setting within the landscape feature of Masslough Lake and woodland.

The urban form of this planned estate village dating back to 1612, developed essentially in a linear pattern along Main Street, however overtime this streetscape extended to the south to include the Durrow Road and the Castlecomer Road at the bottom of Stanhope Street. To the north, the gateway to the village from Abbeyleix is marked by impressive ‘toll trees’ where a toll was once paid by visitors to the village.

The Main Street has the layout of an estate village, comprising a wide and open boulevard, with a continuous building line defining the boulevard on either side and creating a vista which terminates in the village square framed with 2 and 3 storey buildings and a monument dedicated to the local men who died in the 1798 rebellion. The boulevard is lined with two-storey simple, rendered and generally well-proportioned buildings, orientated towards the street and are punctuated by 2 gothic churches and terminates in the village square, which creates the central focal point of the village. Some historic painted timber shopfronts have been retained to village centre properties creating a strong sense of place. Owing to its unique character and heritage, the village centre has been designated an Architectural Conservation Area and also a Zone of Archaeological Significance.

The southern streetscapes are quite different. Chapel Street is defined along both sides of the street with single storey cottages and 2 storey semi detached and detached dwellings. A low density residential development is also located at the village’s most western boundary. The Castlecomer rd and Ballyragget rd are again lined with single storey and one storey buildings creating a strong sense of enclosure. At the southern end of the Castlecomber road the graveyard marks the southern boundary to the village. A number of new residential areas have been established around the town, namely Heywood Village lakeside homes on the Abbeyleix approach road, Monaclear on the Durrow Road and Masslough Meadow Estate at the top of Chapel Street.

7.2.2  DEVELOPMENT AND REGENERATION STRATEGY

Village Centre Renewal and Residential Development

The population of Ballinakill has grown by 1.5% over the last census period which represents a low rate of growth in comparison to other villages in the north of the County. Ballinakill is identified as a rural village within the settlement hierarchy and as such only limited residential development shall be accommodated within the lifetime of the Plan.

The Core Strategy of the Plan provides a housing allocation of 45 units over the Plan period. A review of extant planning permissions within the town has determined that there are no committed units.

All new residential development shall be accommodated in infill development in 3 land parcels to the north and south of the village centre. There is substantial backland area to the east of Main Street, however this area is substantially landlocked with restricted access from Main Street and Chapel Lane. The area is also within the Balinakill ACA which further impedes access.

In terms of regeneration of the historic village centre, there are a number of properties off Market Square which are currently vacant and in danger of dereliction. Of particular note is an opportunity site the south east corner of Market Square (indicated as Opportunity Site 1 in Fig 7.2) which has the potential to regenerate a significant traditional structure in need of repair. The site is also located within the zone of archaeological potential and includes a protected structure and two monuments, including the site and ruins of the former charter town tower house or castle. This site is zoned for village centre uses which would allow a mix of uses to take place including economic, tourism and residential. Any redevelopment of the site must include detailed archaeological and architectural impact assessments.

Fig 7.2: Opportunity Sites 1 and 2

It was also noted that there are a number of vacant/derelict housing units along Chapel Lane (indicated as Opportunity Sites 2) that would provide an opportunity for refurbishment and redevelopment on site areas of 0.24ha and 0.21ha. It is imperative that any new development is integrated seamlessly within existing residential development.

Social and Community Infrastructure

Ballinakill is well-served by way of social infrastructure. The village has a primary school located in the village centre and a playschool adjacent. The community centre is located on the Main Street and is used by the local groups, which caters for a wide catchment area. GAA playing fields are located to the north of the village.

An outdoor swimming pool is located off Main Street within the village centre and is well-used during the summer months. Most recently Laois County Council prepared a Part 8 for lands adjacent to the swimming for a playground.

Ballinakill has a good network of green infrastructure with walks around the Mass Lough and the landscaped gardens of the Heywood Demesne. The community hall facilitates Bingo, snooker and squash courts.

Ballinakill has a proactive community and has most recently prepared a non statutory Community Plan (2018 – 2022) which aims to address the economic and social development of the village over the coming years. This plan has identified a number of issues facing Ballinakill and provides a suite of objectives the community would like to see develop over the life time of the plan such the development of tourism in the area and in particular additional walking routes which links to Mass Lough, Heywood Gardens and the village and facilitate the upgrade and development of community facilities on parish lands. This Plan has been informed by the objectives of the Ballinakill Community Plan and will support further initiatives.

Economic Development

Ballinakill is identified as a fourth tier retail centre in the County Retail Hierarchy. It has a small range of retail services, primarily a local convenience shop, weekly mart, a pharmacy and a number of public houses. The village would benefit from a greater range and variety of such facilities for the wider community.

Due to its location in proximity to a number of natural and cultural amenities such as Mass Lough, River Nore and Heywood Demesne, the tourism potential of the village should be developed especially for in the area of angling and outdoor activities. Ballinakill is also in a prime location, offering significant heritage and amenity tourism products in proximity to both Durrow and Abbeyleix to merit its inclusion on Failte Ireland’s, Irelands Ancient East route.

7.2.3  WRITTEN OBJECTIVES

Built Form and Regeneration

BK 1       Protect and enhance the archaeological heritage of Ballinakill Zone of Archaeological Potential;

BK 2       Mixed-use applications which comprise a housing element will be open to consideration within the village centre zoning.

BK 3       Preserve and enhance the special character and appearance of Ballinakill’s Architectural Conservation Area (ACA) by requiring that the height, scale, design and materials of any proposed development within the village and in the surrounding area should complement the character of the village and not diminish its distinctiveness of place.  New buildings should respond to the individual site context and take due cognisance of adjoining development.

BK 4       Introduce consistent village branding/presentation/public realm at the village entry points and along main streets in form of high quality signage, tourism information, public art and consistent village type lighting standards which would strengthen Ballinkill’s identity

BK 5       Encourage and facilitate the re-use and regeneration of Opportunity Site 1 to a public/community/enterprise uses which will provide an opportunity to capitalise on its prominent location in Market Square indicated in Map 7.2(b);

BK 6       Encourage and facilitate the regeneration of Opportunity Sites 2 for residential development indicated in Map 7.2(b);

BK 7       Examine the feasibility of making the Toll Trees at entrance to village subject of a Tree Preservation Order;

BK 8       Encourage the restoration or redevelopment of vacant and derelict buildings in the village centre;

 

Economic and Community Development

BK 9       Support the development of tourist related development in the village and market the village for proximity to natural and cultural amenities;

BK 10     Facilitate and support the expansion of commercial services within the village core;

BK 11     Support the development of commercial tourism and walking/cycling routes around Mass Lough, Heywood Garden and the village centre to support an evolving active tourism product for the area;

BK 12     Encourage additional employment opportunities at the Mart site;

BK 13     Upgrade the outdoor swimming pool and provide a playground on Parish lands;

BK 14     Support the provision, expansion or redevelopment of Social Infrastructure and community facilities;

 

Infrastructure

BK 15     Improve pedestrian linkages in the town and provide cycling linkages and cycle parking at buildings in community use, particularly schools;

BK 16     Facilitate the mobility of persons with special needs by way of disabled parking provision and suitable pedestrian network;

BK 17     Restore the Walkways particularly at Brewery Lane and Dunphy’s Lane.

 

7.3      CLOUGH

Population

Estimate (No Census details)

58

Housing Stock

Estimate (No Census detaisl)

20

Infrastructure

Water

Waste Water

 

Servicing Road Network

Broadband

Private wells

Waste Water Treatment Plant – constructed wetland

Local road

Partially serviced and remaining areas serviced under the National Broadband Plan

Social Infrastructure

School

Church

Sporting Facilities

Other

Clough NS (enrolment 82)

RC Church

Clough/Ballacolla GAA located in Ballacolla

2 Community Hall, pub

Environment /Heritage

Conservation

Flooding

1km north of Grantstown Wood and Lake pNHA

NA

Sustainable Transport

Bus Services

Cycle Routes

Bi Weekly Local Link service to Portlaoise

Destination along Slieve Bloom Bike Trail

Cultural Heritage

Protected Structures

1 Protected Structure

7.3.1  CHARACTER AND CONTEXT

Clough is a picturesque late 18th century village set in the heart of the south Laois countryside and located on a local road 6km north east of Rathdowney, approximiately 1km west of the M8. Clough Church was built in 1770 and refurbished in 1871 and is one of the main distinguishing features of the village. The church was built alongside St. Canice's Monastery, Aghaboe and is of great historical significance to the area.

The development envelope for Clough stretches from a south east direction from the church to the school, giving it a dispersed urban structure. Development within the village consists of a community centre, graveyard, playschool, school and pub.

7.3.2  REGENERATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Housing Land Requirement

Clough has not experienced growth similar to that which has occurred in other villages within the County. In this regard the facilities available are considered to be adequate at present and village will remain a small scale village settlement in the settlement hierarchy of the Plan.

The capacity to accommodate multi house residential development is low, however appropriate infill development will be supported to consolidate development.

Village Regeneration

Potential for regeneration the village is limited given the rural character of the village. Some infill development opportunities are present within the village centre zoning, which would allow for limited local services.

In terms of community facilities, the requirement for a new community centre has been highlighted. In this regard appropriate land has been zoned for such uses and associated recreation space in the village.

Infrastructure

An Integrated Constructed Wetlands was built to service the existing housing scheme at Limekiln.

7.3.3  WRITTEN OBJECTIVES

Character and Built Form

CL 1        Consolidate the urban structure of the village by way of infill development;

CL 2        Provide landscaping features and welcome signs incorporating natural materials to be located on the approach roads to the village in consultation with the community;

 

Economic/Community Development

CL 3        Support commercial uses within the village centre necessary for the population of the village;

CL 4        Support the[a3]  development of a new community centre and recreation space on appropriately zoned land;

CL 5        Enhance the amenity area surrounding the old kiln and identify and develop active and passive recreational facilities;

 

Infrastructure

CL 7        Secure cycle parking facilities at the national school, church and community centre;

CL 8        Improve the road network incrementally;

CL 9        Ensure that the WWTP is upgraded to meet the requirements of the population and that all works associated with the upgrade are assessed according to Article 6 of the Habitats Directive;

 

7.4      ERRILL

Population

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

% Increase/Decrease

182

196

-7%

Housing Stock

 

2016 Census

Vacancy

91

19

Infrastructure

Water

Waste Water

 

Servicing Road Network

Broadband

Errill Group Water Scheme

Errill has its own wastewater infrastructure (Additional capacity XX PE).

Crossroads of the R433 and local roads

Partially serviced and remaining areas shall be serviced under the National Broadband Plan

Social Infrastructure

School

Church

Sporting Facilities

Other

S N Naomh Colmcille (enrolment 71)

Our Lady Queen of the Universe Church RC

GAA pitch

2 pubs, shop, HSE health centre (closed), community centre

Environment /Heritage

Conservation

 

Flooding

River Barrow/Nore SAC (002162), The Curragh and Goul River Marsh pNHA (000420)

NA

Sustainable Transport

Bus Services

Cycle Routes

Local Trip

NA

Cultural Heritage

Protected Structures

Monuments

NA

1 National Monument

7.4.1  CONTEXT AND CHARACTER

Errill village is located in southwest Laois close to the Tipperary/ Kilkenny border, 6.5 kilometres from Rathdowney and 16 kilometres from Borris in Ossory.

The village development envelope for Errill stretches from the central diamond area in a linear manner along four approach roads with the majority of development forming towards the eastern and southern boundary of the village. The village core centres around the local shop and public houses, where traditional style single storey and two storey buildings line both sides of the street.

The Rathdowney approach road to the east comprises of a privately owned sports grounds and a long established low density housing development, while the southern area comprises of a mixture of new and old dwellings of varying styles.

Social infrastructure is relatively disperse from the village core with the primary school and community hall located 0.5km south of the village core and the GAA playing fields located 1km north. In terms of natural and cultural heritage, Ballagh Castle and Ballagh Bog are located 2.5km south of the village core.

7.4.2  REGENERATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Housing Land Requirement

Population has decreased by 7% since the last Census and minimal development has taken place in the period of the previous Development Plan.

There is currently a Laois County Council approved (Part 8) housing development of 14 dwellings planned on residential zoned land to the south of the village core.

A housing allocation of 45 units has been indicated in the Core Strategy which can be accommodated on lands to the north east and south west of the village. The village also has capacity within the existing infrastructure to facilitate New Homes in Small Towns and Villages, for the development of serviced sites to create ‘build your own home’ opportunities within the existing footprint of village on residential zoned.

Village Centre Regeneration

Potential for regeneration the village is limited given the rural character of the village. Some vacant units and infill development opportunities are present within the village centre zoning, which would allow for limited local services.

Errill has a strong and active community sector, Errill Vision Group, who has regularly received grant aid for the upgrading of social infrastructure in the village. Most recently a non statutory Errill Village Plan was prepared with a focus on driving community and economic development. A number of priority projects have been noted including the redevelopment of St Bernadette’s Hall, the reopening and redevelopment of the village health centre, new and improved sporting recreation facilities such as a new playground.

7.4.3  WRITTEN OBJECTIVES

Character and Built Form

ERR1      Protect the distinctive diamond shape and related green open spaces and ensure infill development or redevelopment is sympathetic in relation to building lines, roof profiles and building heights;

ERR2      Enhance the soft landscaping and provide seating to the central passive open spaces;

 

Economic and Community Development

ERR 3     Support the existing commercial services in Errill and facilitate their expansion subject to proper planning and sustainable development and design standards;

ERR 4     Support the redevelopment of the old HSE building to provide a community hub and facilitate communal facilities;

ERR 5     Support the development of a village park;

ERR 6     Support the objectives of Errill Village Plan, insofar as practicable;

               

Infrastructure

ERR 7     Improve pedestrian linkages and provide cycling linkages within the village centre and between the village centre, residential housing estates and the GAA playing fields, St Bernadette’s Hall and Errill NS;

ERR 8     Provide disabled parking within the village centre;

ERR 9     Improve pedestrian and cycle linkage to cultural tourism locations of Ballagh Castle and Ballagh Bog

 

7.5      KILLEEN        

Population

(Killabban ED)

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

% Increase/Decrease

434

420

3%

Housing Stock

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

169

169

Infrastructure

Water

Waste Water

 

Servicing Road Network

Broadband

Borehole

Waste Water Treatment Plant (Additional capacity of 115 PE)

Crossroads of the R429 and local roads

Partially serviced and remaining areas shall be serviced under the National Broadband Plan

Social Infrastructure

School

Church

Sporting Facilities

Other

St Abban’s National School (enrolment 94)

St Abban’s Church RC

GAA pitch shared with Arles

Pub, community centre

Environment /Heritage

Conservation

 

Flooding

River Barrow/Nore SAC (002162), The Curragh and Goul River Marsh pNHA (000420)

Extensive FRZ A and B

Sustainable Transport

Bus Services

Cycle Routes

Local Trip

NA

Cultural Heritage

Protected Structures

1 Protected Structure

7.5.1  CHARACTER AND CONTEXT

Killeen village is located in east County Laois in close proximity to the Kildare border, anchored to the west and east by tributaries of the River Barrow, approximately 10km north of Carlow Town. The traditional village development envelope for Killeen is centred on a staggered cross road, with St Abban’s Catholic Church forming the focal point for the village. Development formed along the main street in the village, the R429, which consists of the primary school, community centre and a local authority housing estate.

Social infrastructure within the village consist of a local pub, Killeen Community Centre and St Abban’s National School. Much of the village is restricted from development by noted flood zones.

7.5.2  REGENERATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Housing Land Requirement

The village has seen significant residential development in the mid 2000s with the development of a high density residential estate and village green located to the south of the church.

There is an extant permission for 30 to the south east of the existing residential development, some of which are serviced sites in phase 2 of the development. A housing allocation of 30 units has been identified within the Core Strategy of the Plan. Only natural/organic residential growth will be encouraged over the lifetime of the Development Plan in line with the Development Plan Core Strategy.

Village Regeneration

Potential for regeneration is limited given the rural character of the village. This Plan will support the expansion of existing social infrastructure in the village to support the community.

7.5.3  WRITTEN OBJECTIVES

Character and Built Form

KL 1        Develop a tree planting scheme and biodiversity and landscape plan for the village centre to include the placing of native species of trees, plants and flower beds along the streetscape particularly outside the church and community centre;

 

Economic and Community Development

KL 2        Support the development of local enterprise and commercial uses on suitably zoned lands within Killeen;

KL 3        Encourage the enhancement of community services and the more active use of the community centre;

 

Infrastructure

KL 4        Improve pedestrian linkages and provide cycling linkages within the village centre and between the village centre and residential areas.

 

7.6      KILLESHIN

Population

(Ballickmoyler ED)

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

% Increase/Decrease

650

615

6%

Housing Stock

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

252

233

Infrastructure

Water

Waste Water

 

Servicing Road Network

Broadband

The water supply from Carlow County Council

Waste Water Treatment Plant in Mortarstown, Carlow

R430

Partially serviced and remaining areas shall be serviced under the National Broadband Plan

Social Infrastructure

School

Church

Sporting Facilities

 

Other

1 Primary school

Catholic Church

GAA pitch, Soccer pitch, community centre/all weather pitch

Pub, community centre, playschool and shop, local enterprise centre

Environment /Heritage

Conservation

Flooding

1.5km south of River Barrow/Nore SAC

FRZ A and Bto the north and south of the development boundary

Sustainable Transport

Bus Services

Cycle Routes

Local Service

NA

Cultural Heritage

Protected Structures

Monuments

None within the village

None within the village

CHARACTER AND CONTEXT

Killeshin village is located in southeast Laois 4km to the north west of Carlow Town and on the Regional Road (R430) between Abbeyleix and Carlow.

The development envelope for Killeshin stretches in a northwest to southeast direction along the R430. The village core consists of a village shop, the old national school and community hall. The village has significant cultural heritage located to the south of the development boundary which includes the parish church, medieval church ruins and old graveyard.

The Church of St. Brigid and the Sacred Heart occupies a prominent and elevated site to the north of the village. Killeshin has experienced significant growth and development pressure in recent years as a result of its proximity to Carlow Town. The village has significantly developed to the east with the development of a private housing development, Rath Glen and the new primary school.

Public recreational space is found at the GAA playing fields located to the north east of the village and also within the community centre area. The community centre on the site of the old national school has a number of businesses and incubator units operating on site employing 57 people, including; The Den childcare facility, hairdresser, tea which provides essential services for the community.

REGENERATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Housing Land Requirement

The village has seen significant residential development over the past 10 years with the development of Rath Glen to the east of the village.  However, Killeshin has not been identified as a settlement by the Central Statistic Office which limits detailed analysis of population. However the settlement lies within the ED of Ballickmoyler which indicates the area has grown by 6% since the last Census.

A review of extant planning permissions has determined that there are 50 committed units on the remaining areas of new residential land zoning to the south east of the village core. The development of Killeshin is dependent on the Waste Water Treatment Plant capacity for Carlow and the level of development is limited by this fact. The Core Strategy has provided a housing allocation of 69 units during the lifetime of the Plan. There are no Brownfield or infill opportunities within the village. Sufficient land is zoned to accommodate this growth.

Village Centre Regeneration

Due to recent residential development and the relocation of the school to the northern limits of the village boundary, there is limited scope with the traditional village core for new development, however there is opportunity for consolidation and creating better links to the main residential area of Rath Glen.

The heart of the village centres around the Community Centre, where a considerable amount of the structures on site are of a temporary construction, however recent permission has been granted for permanent structures. This Plan supports the redevelopment of this vital resource by extending the mixed use zoning to include the green area to the east and connect with the area zoned mixed use within Rath Glen to provide a more connected and consolidated village core. It has also been identified within the Killeshin Sustainable Community Plan, that a village playground with recreational equipment is required due to recent growth. An area behind the community centre is the preferred choice for such an amenity area.

Killeshin has a strong and active community. Most recently, a non statutory Killeshin Sustainable Community Plan was prepared with a focus on driving community and economic development. A number of priority projects have been noted including the redevelopment of a more prominent village hub, playground including outdoor gym, upgrade to Killeshin Community Hall, outdoor communal space for running markets, fetes etc, development of Killeshin Waterworks as a recreational and tourist amenity in the area and traffic safety improvements.

WRITTEN OBJECTIVES

Sustainable Development and Regeneration

KN 1       Protect and enhance the archaeological heritage of Killeshin;

KN 2       Prepare a masterplan[a6]  for the redevelopment of village core to support the expansion of the community centre and business units to consolidate the centre with the development opportunity within Rath Glen.

KN 3       Facilitate the provision of sheltered housing facilities for the elderly;

KN 4       Seek to provide open space and recreational areas for the local population, in particular a playground. This could potentially be located to the rear of the community centre;

 

Economic Development

KN 5       Protect and support the expansion of the existing retail use of Killeshin;

KN 6       Facilitate and support the expansion of commercial services within the village core;

KN 7       Support the development of Killeshin Waterworks as a recreation and amenity area;

KN 8       Support the objectives of the Killeshin Sustainable Community Plan insofar as practicable;

 

Infrastructure

KN 9       Enhance pedestrian and cycle linkages within the village core and between new residential estates and the church, including a safe pedestrian crossing;

KN 10     Improve road network incrementally, including traffic calming measures to reduce traffic speed;

KN 11     Facilitate the upgrading of car parking, including disabled parking at the church, old school house and community centre;

KN 12     Encourage the provision of a public garden with allotments for the benefit of the local community;

KN 13     Facilitate the development of an underpass at Cappalug Road subject to having the necessary funding in place.

 

Submissions