Section 6 Villages Population > 500

opendate_range12 Jan, 2021, 9:00am - 23 Mar, 2021, 5:00pm

6. VILLAGES > 500 POPULATION

Note: Please click on the links to supporting zoning maps to the right under Materials.

6.1      CLONASLEE

Population

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

% Increase/Decrease

566

518

9%

Housing Stock

2016 Census

Vacancy

266

16

Infrastructure

Water

Waste Water

 

Servicing Road Network

Broadband

Water Treatment Plant

Waste Water Treatment Plant (Additional capacity of 545 PE)

R422 (Mountmellick to Kinnity)

Partially serviced and remaining areas serviced under the National Broadband Plan

Social Infrastructure

Schools

 

Church

Sporting Facilities

Other

Clonaslee College 237, Scoil Bhride National School 118

St Manman’s RC Church

St Manman’s GAA

2 community centres, Public House, Garda station, credit union, pharmacy, restaurant, shop, post office, machinery outlet, petrol station and shop, Level 5 Retails Centre

Environment

Conservation

 

Flooding

The Sliabh Bloom Mountains are located to the immediate south of the village centre

FRZ A and B associated with River Clodiagh and Gorragh River

Cultural Heritage

Protected Structures

Monuments

8 protected structures

2 national monuments

Sustainable Transport

Public Transport

Laois Link – twice weekly to Portlaoise

6.1.1  CONTEXT AND CHARACTER

Clonaslee is a picturesque village in the north of the County, situated in the foothills of the Sliabh Bloom Mountains, anchored by the Clodiagh River and Gorragh River to the west and east respectively. The village is situation on the R422 Mountmellick to Birr road, 20km north west of Portlaoise. Access to Clonsalee was facilitated in the 19th century by the Cut, an impressive mountain pass cut through red sandstone. Nearby are the ruins of the Gothic mansion Brittas House and Castlecuffe, an early 17th century fortified dwelling.

The urban form of the village has developed essentially along 2 intersecting streets, Main Street and the Tullamore road. The Main Street has the layout of an estate village, comprising a wide and open boulevard, with a continuous building line defining the boulevard on either side and creating a vista which terminates in the Visitor’s Centre, formerly the Church of Ireland. The boulevard with its two-storey simple, rendered and generally well-proportioned buildings, orientated towards the street and punctuated by the cut-stone former church, is the primary focus of the village. To the west of the main street, a small triangular green space contributes to the character of the village. Buildings front onto the green creating a strong sense of place and enclosure. A small hard landscaped square directly in front of Hickey‘s pub, close to the bridge over the Clodiagh River provides a pleasant amenity space. This area has been designated an Architectural Conservation Area.

The streetscape of the Tullamore Road which runs parallel to the Clodiagh River, is quite different. At the southern end, closer to the village, two-storey buildings create a strong feeling of urban enclosure on one side. Beyond the church gates, the building form changes and one-storey buildings predominate. At the southern end of this road, the village is anchored by a trailhead to Slieve Bloom Mountains and walking loops around Brittas House and Lakes.

6.1.2  DEVELOPMENT AND REGENERATION STRATEGY

6.1.2.1                   Village Centre Renewal and Residential Development

The population of Clonaslee has grown by 9% over the last census period which represents a moderate rate of growth. Clonaslee is identified as a rural village within the settlement hierarchy and as such only limited residential development shall be accommodated within the lifetime of the Plan. There are no extant planning permissions for housing developments within the village.

The Core Strategy of the Plan provides a housing allocation of 51 units over the Plan period. A review of extant planning permissions within the town has determined that there are no committed units. All further new residential development is accommodated in infill development and land to the west of the town centre as close as possible to the village centre area thus promoting sustainable land use and transport. It is imperative that any new development is integrated seamlessly within existing residential development for modest, low density housing schemes.

The primary focus of the development strategy for Clonaslee is to strengthen and consolidate the village core. There will be a focus on regeneration of the historic core where a number of properties are currently vacant. Appropriate reuse of under utilised sites for commercial uses is vital and encouraged and bringing the backland areas into use.

6.1.2.2                   Economic Development

Clonaslee is identified as a Level 5 retail centre in the County Retail Hierarchy. It has a small range of retail services, primarily a local convenience shop/post office, machinery sales outlet, a pharmacy, restaurant, petrol station and a number of public houses. The village would benefit from a greater range and variety of such facilities for the wider community.

In order to facilitate the sustainable development of Clonaslee, a village regeneration strategy is proposed which builds on the tourism potential and opportunities of its unique location within the foothills of the Slieve Bloom Mountains, where the village could be developed as a key hub within the area.

There are a number of key elements to the development and regeneration of Clonaslee which are indicated on Map 6.1(b) to enhance public realm within the village core and the gateways, and improve parking facilities and way finding to the Clonaslee Trailhead and Brittas Forest. Appropriate land has been zoned for the development of tourist related initiatives is indicated on Map 6.1(a) of the Plan.

6.1.2.3                   Social and Community Infrastructure

Clonaslee is well-served by way of social infrastructure. The village has two primary schools, one in the village and one at Castlecuffe. A community crèche is located in the old boys school which caters for between 30-35 children. A second level school, Clonaslee College is also located in the village which serves the sounding hinterland. This school is located in the grounds of the well-utilised community centre. A playground, a recycling bring bank and all weather playing pitches where basketball and badminton are played are also located adjacent to the community centre. The GAA grounds are also conveniently located within the village centre.

Clonaslee is also a hub for active tourism associated within the Slieve Bloom Mountains and also the heritage areas of Brittas Forest and Lake. Clonaslee is one of 3 noted trailheads on the Slieve Bloom Way in the County. Clonaslee also has two looped walks around Brittas Wood and Lake – the Rickets Rocks Glendinoregan looped walks.

6.1.3  WRITTEN OBJECTIVES

Built Form and Regeneration

CLON 1 Mixed-use applications which comprise a housing element will be open to consideration  within the village centre zoning, loss of active commercial or retail floorspace to residential use will not be accepted;

CLON2 Preserve and enhance the special character and appearance of Clonaslee’s Architectural Conservation Area (ACA) by requiring that the height, scale, design and materials of any proposed development within the village and in the surrounding area should complement the character of the village and not diminish its distinctiveness of place.  New buildings should respond to the individual site context and take due cognisance of adjoining development;

CLON3  Introduce consistent village branding/presentation/public realm at the village entry points and along main streets in form of high quality signage, tourism information, public art and consistent village type lighting standards which would strengthen Clonaslee’s identity;

CLON4  Require the preservation and reinstatement of traditional details and materials on existing buildings and the streetscape where improvements or maintenance works are being carried out.

 

Economic/Community Development

CLON 5                 Protect the established retail and commercial functions within the village;

CLON 6                 Promote the tourism product offered in Clonaslee having regard to its archaeological and architectural heritage and proximity to the conservation areas of Brittas Forest and Slieve Bloom Mountains;

CLON 7                 Promote Clonaslee as a tourist hub and as a destination for active tourism and as a multi experience tourism destination for visitors to Ireland’s Ancient East.;

CLON 8                 Support the development of tourist related initiatives having regard to the Strategic Flood Risk Assessment;

CLON 9                 Encourage provision of an Elderly Day Care Service and associated accommodation for the elderly in consultation with the Health Services Executive and local developers;

CLON 10               Enhance sporting facilities within the village including GAA facilities;

CLON 11               Support provision, expansion or redevelopment of Social Infrastructure including recreational amenities (Public Open Space, GAA facilities, etc), Educational Amenities (School and Child-care) and Community Facilities;

 

Infrastructure

CLON 12               Improve pedestrian linkages in the town and provide cycling linkages and cycle parking at buildings in community use, particularly schools;

CLON 13               Provide additional vehicular and cycle parking in proximity to Brittas Forest and Clonaslee Trailhead;

CLON 14               Encourage the removal of overhead power lines and their placement underground;

CLON 15               Work with Offaly County Council to manage the condition of the Clodiagh River.

 

6.2      BALLYROAN

Population

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

% Increase/Decrease

563

455

+23%

Housing Stock

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

213

25

Infrastructure

Water

 

Waste Water

Servicing Road Network

Broadband

Crubeen Upper GWS and Tullore Public Water Supply

Waste water treatment plant (Additional capacity 900 PE)

R425

Partially serviced and remaining areas serviced under the National Broadband Plan

Social Infrastructure

School

Church

 

Sporting Facilities

Other

Scoil Eoin Phoil II Naofa NS (enrolment 159)

St Patrick’s Church RC, Ballyroan Church of Ireland Church

Ballyroan Abbey GAA

2 pubs, local shop and petrol station, crèche, Community Hall, health centre

Environment/Heritage

Conservation

Flooding

6km east of River Nore SPA

FRZ A and B associated with the Glorian River

Sustainable Transport

Bus Services

Cycle Routes

Local Link and Slieve Bloom Coaches

NA

Cultural Heritage

Protected Structures

Monuments

9 Protected Structures

5 National Monuments

6.2.1  CONTEXT AND CHARACTER

Ballyroan has a significant cultural heritage which can be traced as far back as the Middle Ages, where a castle is likely to have stood on the eastern side of the Glorian River, built by Conall Ó Mórdha, son of Daibhí Ó Mórdha, Lord of Laois in the 14th Century. The area remained in the hands of the O'Mores until the 16th Century. Today, all that remains is a large mound and fosse which is planted over with trees, where it can be seen that the majority of the village developed on the eastern side of the castle.

Ballyroan Village is located 10km south of Portlaoise and 5km north of Abbeyleix on the R425. The village stretches in a linear manner along the Main Street (R425) where the streetscape consists of 2 storey traditional structures and uses mainly consist of residential and some commercial uses, with community and institutional uses more dispersed along Chapel Street. 

The majority of residential development is located toward the eastern approach to the village along Chapel Street and on the south western approach from Abbeyleix along the R425. The village is well serviced in terms of community and social infrastructure with a church, primary school, multi functional community hall, the old National School serving as a community space and Ballyroan Abbey GAA Club located further east along the Spink road.

A village green is located to the south of the Main Street which allows for passive recreational needs of the community, with the larger housing estates served by pockets of public open space which also allow for a range of activities. 

6.2.2  REGENERATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

6.2.2.1                   Housing  Land Requirement

Population has significantly increased 23% between 2011 and 2016. A housing allocation of 63 units has been indicated in the Core Strategy, 47 units of which can be accommodated on infill/brownfield lands. Adequate infill opportunities on sites off Chapel Street have been indentified for residential development. There are a number of extant planning permissions consisting of 23 dwellings units and 4 dwelling units on 2 sites to the west of the village centre and 20 dwelling units off Chapel Street. A scheme of 20 dwellings was approved (Part VIII) by Laois County Council as an extension to the current Housing scheme – Gleann na Glaisce. Consideration shall also be given to facilitate New Homes in Small Towns and Villages initiatives, for the residential development of serviced sites.

6.2.2.2   Village Centre Renewal

A number of key sites exist within the village core which presents the potential for physical and social regeneration with the support of private and public-sector investment, including the Rural Regeneration and Development Fund. Accordingly, the potential to improve economic and social development opportunities within the village is supported in this plan. 

Fig 7.2: Opportunity Sites 1 and 2

Opportunity Site 1: This site comprises of the former Boys National School, which is currently vacant and situated in a prime location to the north of the village core. The site is rectangular in shape with a site area of circa 0.45 ha, bounded on the east by R425, and to the rear by open space. The site is zoned village centre and has the potential to provide a suitable mix of uses including community enterprise, remote working hub or light commercial.

Opportunity Site 2: This is a significant site within the village core along Main Street which comprises of 2 different land parcels - 17th century semi detached building with traditional shopfront currently in a state of disrepair and the remains of a detached 2 storey former house c 1170, both structure being Protected Structures. The site also includes a detached 2 storey dwelling house of vernacular style and associated outbuildings. This larger site area is also located within the zone of influence of a recorded monument of Ballyroan Castle. Both sites have considerable backland areas. The overall complex[a2]  is circa 0.7 ha and is zoned for village centre development.  The potential for development or reuse within the spheres of residential, employment, tourism, sport and recreation should be further explored in the context of regeneration. Any potential development within this complex should have regard to the requirement to respect the architectural and cultural heritage value of its context and be compatible with surrounding uses in the area.

6.2.3  WRITTEN OBJECTIVES

Character and Built Form

BR 1       Encourage the maintenance of buildings within village core and encourage the regeneration of key derelict, vacant or underused village centre buildings noted as Opportunity Sites 1 and 2 on Map 6.2(b)of the Plan as appropriate.

BR 2       Support the development of serviced sites under the New Homes in Small Towns and Villages Initiative

BR 3       Protect (RPS 657) from further endangerment and secure the longevity of this seventeenth century structure.

 

Economic and Community Development

BR 4       Support the functioning of Ballyroan as a retail, commercial and community service centre for residents of the village and the wider hinterland

BR 5       Support the existing uses within the village core and encourage the development of mixed uses subject to development management standards.

BR 6       Encourage the more intensive use of the Community Centre including the potential for the interchanging of crèche and other community services in the centre.

BR 7       Support the reuse and redevelopment of the Ballyroan Boys National School and the Old School House for community/enterprise purposes.

 

Infrastructure[a3] 

BR 8       Provide and improve pedestrian linkages and cycle linkages within the village centre and between the village centre, community facilities and residential estates.

BR 9       Provide disabled parking within the village centre and at buildings in community use.

BR 10     Liaise with Irish Water to secure adequate water supplies to facilitate future development in Ballyroan.

 

6.3      BORRIS IN OSSORY

Population

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

% Increase/Decrease

508

475

7%

Housing Stock

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

260

54

Infrastructure

Water

Waste Water

 

Servicing Road Network

Broadband

Public Water - Donaghmore Borehole

Waste Water Treatment Plant (Additional capacity of 1092 PE)

R445 (Roscrea to Mountrath Rd)

Serviced

Social Infrastructure

Schools

Church

Sporting Facilities

Other

St Joseph’s NS (enrolment 106)

Catholic and Church of Ireland Church

GAA Grounds

Public House, Garda station, pharmacy, restaurant, shop, post office, petrol station and shop, Level 5 Retail Centre

Environment

Conservation

Flooding

River Nore SPA located 1km north

FRZ A and B to the west of the village and FRZ A to the east of the village

Cultural Heritage

Protected Structures

Monuments

12 Protected Structure

1 national Monuments

Sustainable Transport

Public Transport

Laois Link – twice weekly to Portlaoise

6.3.1  CHARACTER AND CONTEXT

Borris in Ossory is located on the old N7 Dublin-Limerick road, now the R445, and adjacent to junction 21 of the M7 motorway. Borris in Ossory is located 5 kms from Ballybrophy Train Station which provides mainline rail services between Cork, Limerick and Dublin and to smaller settlements such as Roscrea. The village is also a long-established stopping point for inter-urban bus links. Geographically, Borris in Ossory is located in west Laois, close to the Tipperary border between the towns of Mountrath and Roscrea.

The village centre comprises of the Main Street which accommodates the main retail, commercial, institutional, educational and residential functions of the village. There are a number of protected structures in this part of the village. Although the village centre is compact and the architectural quality of the village is strong, Borris in Ossory suffers from dereliction and poor maintenance of some buildings and would benefit from enhancement of the public realm.

Architectural focal points include the Church of Ireland and former courthouse. During 2014 and 2015, works were carried out to conserve the decorative stonework at the courthouse and to restore the historic railings and gates round the building.

6.3.2  DEVELOPMENT AND REGENERATION STRATEGY

Village Centre Renewal and Residential Development

The population of Borris In Ossory has grown by 7% over the last census period which represents a moderate rate of growth. The village is identified as a rural village within the settlement hierarchy and as such only limited residential development shall be accommodated within the lifetime of the Plan.

The Core Strategy of the Plan provides a housing allocation of 75 units over the Plan period. A review of extant planning permissions within the town has determined that there are no committed units. It is anticipated that 40 of the housing allocation could be delivered on infill/brownfield sites.

All new residential development shall be accommodated in infill development and land to the south east of Main Street indicated as Opportunity Site 1 in Fig 6.2 and Map 6.3(b). This site of 2ha is located on the corner of Main Street and the St Patrick’s Terrace Road and is the location of the former Leix County Hotel. This site has a considerable backland area and lies adjacent to an unfinished and derelict housing development. These land parcels could be amalgamated together to provide a mixed use development and provide much needed regeneration for the village. 

In terms of regeneration of the historic core, there are a significant number of properties along Main Street which are currently vacant and in danger of dereliction. The town centre area would benefit from the completion of an Urban Regeneration Framework provide a consolidated approach to regeneration of the village centre to address vacancy and dereliction and appropriate reuse of underutilised sites.  A number of strategic sites are noted however within the village which have considerable community enterprise potential.

Fig 6.3: Opportunity Sites

Opportunity Site 2 is former Convent, which is currently vacant and situated in a prime location to the rear of the church off Main Street.  The site is bounded on the north by the church, west by the primary school and to the south by Greenfield.  The site is zoned Community/Education use with access through the church grounds onto Main Street. This existing vacant and underutilised site has the potential to provide a suitable mix of uses that could serve the wider community such as another possible location for a community centre, digital hub or further education facilities. The Convent is also a Protected Structure (RPS 640) and any proposal for its redevelopment should be sympathic to the architectural quality of the structure.

Further to the west is Opportunity Site 3 which occupies a prominent location on the western approach to the village. Considerable potential exists to develop this site as a new community centre, a tourism hub for nearby attractions or as a creative/digital hub for local employment opportunities. The building is the former courthouse and is listed on the Record of Protected Structures (RPS 319). Any proposals for reuse and refurbishment should include an architectural impact assessment.

Economic Development

Borris In Ossory is identified as a fifth tier retail centre in the County Retail Hierarchy. It has a small range of retail services, primarily a local convenience shop/post office, butchers, a pharmacy, take away, petrol station and a number of public houses. The village would benefit from a greater range and variety of such facilities for the wider community and also renewal initiatives to address the level of vacancy in the village.

In order to facilitate the sustainable development of Borris In Ossory, a strategy is proposed which builds on the enterprise and employment potential and opportunities of its strategic location in proximity to the M7. Adequate enterprise and employment lands have also indicated to the south east of the village to accommodate larger scale employment opportunities, while industrial land is indicated to the west of the village centre. (Should any of these be strategic employment sites).

Social and Community Infrastructure

Recreational space is found at the Gaelic playing fields located 1.5km to the east of the village. The amenities include a playing pitch, dressing and meeting rooms. While, the existing community facilities are limited, an extensive range of community groups are present in the village with O’Brien Hall playing an important communal and recreational role. Regarding childcare facilities, the village has a play school, crèche, after school club and school collection services. A new primary school opened in 2012.

Borris In Ossory has a proactive community and voluntary sector and most recently prepared a Community Plan (2018 – 2022) which aims to address the economic and social development of the village over the coming years. This plan has identified a number of issues facing Borris In Ossory and provides a suite of objectives the community would like to see develop over the life time of the plan such as additional community facilities, services for younger and older people and economic development to address the declining economic profile of the village. This Plan has been informed by the objectives of the Borris In Ossory Plan and will support further initiatives.

Physical Infrastructure

The present public water scheme is sourced at Donaghmore borehole. The village also has its own waste water treatment plant. There is adequate capacity to accommodate future development of this Plan.

6.3.3  WRITTEN OBJECTIVES

Built Form and Regeneration

BIO 1     Consolidate the village centre by way of infill development, backland development and redevelopment as appropriate;

BIO 2     Encourage restoration or redevelopment of derelict sites, vacant or underused buildings within the village centre;

BIO 3     Encourage and facilitate the re-use and regeneration of the old Courthouse and Convent Sites (Opportunity Sites 2 and 3) to a public/community/enterprise uses which will provide an opportunity to capitalise on their prominent locations indicated on Map 6.3(b) of the Plan;

BIO 4     Encourage and facilitate the re-use and regeneration of the Leix County Hotel site and backland areas with unfinished housing development (indicated as Opportunity Sites 1) to residential and mixed use purposes indicated on Map 6.3(b) of the Plan;

MO 5     Support the preparation and implementation of an Urban Regeneration Framework for Borris In Ossory over the plan period;

BIO 6     Enhance the appearance of the Main Street by means of tree planting and biodiversity planting proposals;

 

Economic Development

BIO 7     Encourage industrial development to the west of the town to harness the development potential arising from the proximity to the motorway interchange, require the preparation of a masterplan including site specific flood risk assessment for these lands;

BIO 8     Facilitate business and enterprise development on appropriate lands within and adjoining the village centre;

BIO 9     Retain and improve the range of commercial services available in the village.

BIO 10   Support provision, expansion or redevelopment of social infrastructure (public open space,playground facilities and  educational amenities (school and child-care), and community facilities;

 

Infrastructure

BIO 11   Improve pedestrian and cycle linkages in the town and provide cycle parking at buildings in community use, particularly schools;

BIO 12   Facilitate the mobility of persons with special needs by way of disabled parking provision and suitable pedestrian network;

BIO 13   Facilitate traffic management improvements within the town;

 

6.4      KILLENARD

Population

 

2016 Census

2011 Census

% Increase/Decrease

671

622

8%

Housing Stock

 

2016 Census

Vacancy

249

28

Infrastructure

Water

 

Waste Water

Servicing Road Network

Broadband

Borehole and Water Treatment Plant in Lough

Waste Water Treatment Works in Portarlington

Local Primary Road

Serviced

Social Infrastructure

Schools

Church

Sporting Facilities

Other

Killenard National School

St John’s catholic Church

O Dempsey’s GAA

Public House, hotel, Mount St Anne’s Retreat

Environment

Conservation

Flooding

River Barrow/Nore SAC 2km north

NA

Cultural Heritage

Protected Structures

Monuments

2 Protected Structures

2 National Monuments

Sustainable Transport

Public Transport

Laois Link

6.4.1  CHARACTER AND CONTEXT

Killenard Village is located in northeast Laois in close proximity to the Kildare border, approximately 2.5 km from the former N7 Dublin to Portlaoise Road, 4 km from the M7 and 3 km from the town of Portarlington to the northwest. The village has experienced substantial residential growth during the Celtic Tiger year, owing to the development of The Heritage Hotel and Golf Course.

The village development envelope stretches from Mount Saint Anne’s crossroads to the railway bridge in the North. The historic village core is defined by the Catholic Church, community centre, and the national school buildings where there are good pedestrian linkages between residential areas and social infrastructure. Groups of mature trees on the approach road from Mount St Anne’s into the village contribute to the character of the settlement.

6.4.2  DEVELOPMENT AND REGENERATION STRATEGY

Village Centre Renewal and Residential Development

The population of Killenard has grown by 8% over the last census period which represents a higher than average rate of growth in comparison to other villages in the north of the County. Killenard is identified as a rural village within the settlement hierarchy and as such only organic residential development shall be accommodated within the lifetime of the Plan.

In terms of regeneration, the village core does not have a significant level of vacancy, where only one commercial unit has been identified as vacant. There are no extant planning permissions for housing developments within the village.

Economic Development

Killenard is identified as a fifth tier retail centre in the County Retail Hierarchy. It has a limited range of services only including a pub and restaurant. The village would benefit from a greater range and variety of such facilities for the wider community which could be accommodated within the vacant units to the front of the Hotel complex.

In terms of tourism potential, the Heritage Hotel, Spa and Gold Club is the main amenity in the village and draws visitors from around the Country.

Social and Community Infrastructure

In terms of social infrastructure, the village has a primary school, Catholic Church and a community centre that has a multifunctional communal, educational and recreational role. Developed areas of public open space are currently lacking in Killenard. A substantial area of land is zoned for open space at Mount Saint Anne’s. GAA playing fields are located to the south of the village. There is an extensive leisure resource based at The Heritage Golf and Country Club including a championship and par 3 golf course, international bowls arena, leisure centre, health spa and private walking track.

A Sustainable Community Plan has also been prepared by the community for the village and identified, inter alia, the following objectives. It is an objective of this Plan to support the Killenard Sustainable Community Plan.

  • Strengthen connectivity from the community centre to the GAA Club
  • Improve public realm
  • Improve commercial offering in the village
  • Uprade the community centre and memorial garden
  • Improvements at Mount Henry Cross Roads.

Physical Infrastructure

The source of water supply for Killenard is from a borehole and a water treatment plant in Lough which is at capacity and requires upgrade. Effluent from Killenard is pumped, via a rising main, to the wastewater treatment works in Portarlington and has an additional capacity for 2495 PE.  

6.4.3  WRITTEN OBJECTIVES

Character and Built Form

KD 1       Develop a tree planting scheme and landscape plan for the village centre to include the placing of native species of trees, plants and flower beds along the streetscape particularly outside the church and community centre;

KD 2       Retain a modest building scale along the main thoroughfare of Killenard;

KD 3       Housing developments shall be of a density compatible with the prevailing density of the village, higher densities may be considered within the village centre;

 

Economic and Community Development

KD 4       Support the established tourist related products in the village such as The Heritage Hotel, Golf and Spa complex and Mount St Annes Retreat House;

KD 5       Support the development of further enterprises and commercial uses on suitably zoned lands within Killenard;

KD 6       Examine suitable locations for the development of passive public open space and playgournd;

KD 7       Encourage the enhancement of community services and the more active use of the community centre including the potential for the interchanging of crèche and other community services;

KD 8       Support insofar as practicable the objectives of the Killenard Sustainable Community Plan.

 

Infrastructure

KD 9       Provide disabled parking spaces within or adjacent to the village centre;

KD 10     Facilitate the proposed works on Duke Street Bridge Killenard and at Mount Henry Crossroads to Killenard Community Centre are carried out subject to available funding;