Chapter 12 Built and Cultural Heritage

opendate_range12 Jan, 2021, 9:00am - 23 Mar, 2021, 5:00pm

CHAPTER 12: BUILT AND CULTURAL HERITAGE

Aim:        To protect, conserve and manage the archaeological and architectural heritage of County Laois and to encourage sensitive sustainable development so as to ensure its survival and maintenance for future generations.

12.1  INTRODUCTION

County Laois has a considerable variety of the built heritage that contributes to the identity and culture of the county itself and also to the wider region that are deemed worthy of protection. It includes the Rock of Dunamase the seat or fort of the ancient Irish kings of Laois, the historic towns of Abbeyleix and Durrow, great country houses, demesne landscapes and a significant industrial heritage of our boglands.

12.2  POLICY CONTEXT

Ireland has signed and ratified a number of International and European Conventions and EU Directives such as the European Convention on the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage, 1992 - the Valletta Convention and the Convention for the Protection of the Architectural Heritage of Europe, 1985 - the Granada Convention, which have provided the context for the formulation of national and regional legislation and policy to protect our built and natural heritage.

The following legislation and policy has informed this Chapter:

12.2.1     PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT ACT 2000, AS AMENDED

Comprehensive and systematic legislative provisions for the protection of architectural heritage were introduced by the Planning and Development Act, 2000. It is a mandatory requirement for the Development Plan to include a Record of Protected Structures (RPS) and also provide a number of objectives in relation to the protection of archaeological heritage, structures and areas of special interest, the preservation of the character of the landscape, views and prospects.

12.2.2     THE NATIONAL MONUMENTS ACTS 1930 – 2004

Archaeological heritage is legally protected from unauthorised damage or interference through powers and functions under the National Monuments Acts 1930-2004. Section 10 of the National Monuments (Amendments) Act 1994 made provision for the compilation of all recorded sites and features of historical and archaeological importance in the county into the Record of Monuments and Places (RMP)

12.2.3     FRAMEWORK AND PRINCIPLES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL HERITAGE (1999)

Policy and Guidance on Archaeological Excavation (1999) This Framework and these principles which stipulate the basic principles for the protection of archaeological heritage are based on a presumption of avoiding development impacts on archaeological heritage with preservation in-situ being the first option followed by preservation by record where the archaeological heritage is affected or proposed to be affected by the development.

12.2.4     THE ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE PROTECTION GUIDELINES 2011

These Guidelines are issued under Section 28 and Section 52 of the Planning and Development Act 2000, as amended. Under Section 52(1), the Minister is obliged to issue guidelines to planning authorities concerning development objectives, a) for protecting structures, or parts of structures, which are of special architectural, historical, archaeological, artistic, cultural, scientific, social or technical interest, and b) for preserving the character of architectural conservation areas. Guidelines issued under Section 28 of the Act require planning authorities to have regard to them in the performance of their functions.

12.2.5     THE NATIONAL PLANNING FRAMEWORK (NPF)

Ireland has an abundance of iconic natural heritage areas that not only play a key part in our cultural heritage, but are also an important part of our tourism industry.  The NPF also notes that there is a need to conserve, manage and present our heritage for its intrinsic value and as a support to economic renewal and sustainable employment. 

12.2.6     REGIONAL SPATIAL AND ECONOMIC STRATEGY (RSES)

The RSES acknowledges that the region’s historic environment provides a unique sense of place and makes a positive contribution to quality of life.  The RSES highlights the importance of incorporating best practice in heritage management into land use planning through the protection of historic urban fabric, the sensitive reuse of historic properties and the enhancement of places of special cultural or natural significance and the provision of high quality public realm and recreational spaces. It is a regional policy objective to - promote historic towns in the Region in the practice of heritage-led generation, to promote sensitive and adaptive re-use of historic building stock, industrial features and protected structures.

12.2.7     NATIONAL ADAPTATION PLAN - BUILT & ARCHAEOLOGICAL HERITAGE CLIMATE CHANGE SECTORAL ADAPTATION PLAN

The adaptation strategy and accompanying action plan is a sectoral subset of the National Adaptation Plan in relation to the impact of climate change on built heritage and aims to:

  • Build adaptive capacity within the sector;
  • Reduce the vulnerability of built and archaeological heritage to climate change;
  • Identify and capitalise on the various potential opportunities for the sector.

12.3        ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE

The Council supports the conservation, marketing, interpretation and appreciation of significant architectural assets in the county. Some of these assets comprise individual structures with distinct architectural integrity, groups of buildings, streetscapes, demesne landscapes intrinsically linked to the special interest of country houses, the arrangement of buildings in and around spaces such as in vernacular farmyards and at market squares, the sympathetic evolution of individual structures displaying different architectural trends.

There are two primary mechanisms to protect the county’s architectural heritage:

  • If a structure is considered to be of significant importance, the Council may designate it as a protected structure. A protected structure must be of architectural, historical, archaeological, artistic, cultural, scientific, technical and social interest.
  • If a group of buildings is considered special and is of significant importance, the Council may designate it as an Architectural Conservation Area.  At present there are 7 ACAs in County Laois.

12.3.1                     PROTECTED STRUCTURES

Protected Structures are buildings, features and structures that are protected because they are representative of the diversity of the architectural heritage of the county which are of architectural, historical, archaeological, artistic, cultural, scientific, technical and social interest. Such features are contained in the Record of Protected Structures (RPS). A protected structure, unless otherwise stated, includes the exterior and interior of the structure, the land lying within the curtilage of the structure and any other structure lying within the cartilage. The protection also extends to any features specified as being in the attendant grounds. The 900 structures in the County Laois Record of Protected Structures (RPS) are listed at Appendix 1 of the Plan.

12.3.1.1 Works to a Protected Structure

The placing of a structure on the RPS seeks to ensure that the character of the structure is maintained and any changes or alterations to it are carried out in such a way as to retain and enhance this character. Works to a protected structure, that would, materially affect the character of the structure, require planning permission.

It is important to note that not all works to a Protected Structure will constitute material alterations. Under Section 57 of the Planning and Development Act, 2000 (as amended), owners/occupiers may request a declaration from the Planning Authority as to the type of works, which it considers, would or would not materially affect the character of the structure.

Total or substantial demolition of a Protected Structure or any significant element of the Protected Structure will not be acceptable in principle, save in exceptional circumstances where demolition and redevelopment would produce substantial strategic benefits for the community which would decisively outweigh the loss resulting from demolition.

Policy Objectives for Protected Structures

 

PS 1

Consult with the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government in considering planning applications that may affect Protected Structures or Architectural Conservation Areas (ACA).  The Council will have regard to comments made by the Department and relevant guidelines such as the Architectural Heritage Protection: Guidelines for Planning Authorities (DAHG, 2011) and other pertinent guidelines regarding energy ratings for Protected Structures.

PS 2

Protect and conserve buildings, structures and sites contained in the Record of Protected Structures in accordance with ‘Architectural Heritage Protection Guidelines for Planning Authorities’ 2004.

PS 3

Any development, modification, alteration, or extension affecting a Protected Structure must be prepared by suitably qualified persons and Accompanied by appropriate documentation as outlined in the Architectural Heritage Protection Guidelines for Planning Authorities [DAHG, 2011] to enable a proper assessment of the proposed works and their impact on the structure or area and be carried out to best practice conservation standards. Its setting will be considered against the following criteria, and whether it is:

  • Sensitively sited and designed;
  • Compatible with the special character;
  • Views of principal elevations of the protected structures are not obscured or negatively impacted;
  • Of a premium quality of design and appropriate in terms of the proposed scale, mass, height, density, layout, and materials so that the integrity of the structure and its curtilage is preserved and enhanced.  Where appropriate, the Protected Structure status is used as a stimulus to the imaginative and considered design of new elements.

PS 4

Where the restoration or refurbishment of a Protected Structure or a key Architectural Conservation Area building that is in poor or fair condition is proposed and is for a purpose compatible with the character of the building, the relaxation of development management standards on unit sizes, amenity space or parking will be considered by the Council.

PS 5

Refuse planning permission for the demolition of any protected structure unless the Council is satisfied that exceptional circumstances exist. The demolition of a protected structure with the retention of its façade will likewise not generally be permitted.

PS 6

Favourably consider the change of use of any structure included on the Record of Protected Structures provided such a change of use does not adversely impact on its intrinsic character. In certain cases, the Planning Authority may relax site zoning restrictions / development standards in order to secure the preservation and restoration of the structure.

PS 7

Review and update the Record of Protected Structures on an on-going basis and to make additions and deletions as appropriate

PS 8

Integrate climate-change adaptation measures into all heritage works and maintenance plans by demonstrating green ways of working in historic buildings, ensuring that the carbon footprint of adaptation measures is considered

PS 9

Promote the repair and reuse of existing building stock, including heritage buildings, as a means of avoiding unnecessary carbon outlays with new build

PS 10

Support proposals to improve the thermal performance of historic buildings with renewable energy technologies. Such proposals shall be sensitive to traditional methods of construction to ensure that the proposed works are appropriate and do not cause damage to the structure, require the removal of historic fabric such as original windows, doors and floors, or have a detrimental visual impact.

Protected Structures Development Management Standards

DM PS 1

DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE CURTILAGE OF A PROTECTED STRUCTURE

In considering applications for development within the curtilage and/or attendant grounds of a protected structure, the Council shall have regard to the following:

  • The various elements of the structure which give the protected structure its special character and how these would be impacted on by the proposed development.
  • The proximity of any new development to the main protected structure and any other buildings of heritage value.
  • The design of the new development that should relate to and complement the special character of the protected structure.
  • Outward and inward views from the protected structure are to be protected;
  • High quality design will be a foremost consideration when assessing proposals for development within the curtilage of a protected structure, with particular emphasis on siting, building lines, proportions, scale, massing, height, roof treatment and materials. This does not preclude innovative contemporary buildings. High quality contemporary interventions will be encouraged over historic pastiche. Development proposals should include appraisal of the wider context of the site and structure including its demesne landscape, where applicable.

DM PS 2

RESTORATION OF A PROTECTED STRUCTURE

The following information is required to be submitted with respect to applications for permission for restoration, refurbishment, demolition development or change of use of protected structures:

  • An Architectural Assessment Report as per the Architectural Heritage Protection: Guidelines for Planning Authorities” (2011) Department of the Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht carried out by a suitably qualified person;
  • A comprehensive schedule of proposed work that follows the guidelines set out in the Architectural Heritage Protection: Guidelines for Planning Authorities” (2011) Department of the Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht.

DM PS 3

ARCHITECTURAL ASSESSMENT REPORT

The following information is required to be submitted with respect to applications for permission for restoration, refurbishment, demolition development or change of use of protected structures:

  • An Architectural Assessment Report as per the Architectural Heritage Protection: Guidelines for Planning Authorities” (2011) Department of the Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht carried out by a suitably qualified person;
  • A comprehensive schedule of proposed work that follows the guidelines set out in the Architectural Heritage Protection: Guidelines for Planning Authorities” (2011) Department of the Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht.

12.3.2  ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION AREAS

Section 81 of the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended) describes an Architectural Conservation Area (ACA) as: “An area, place, group of structures or townscape of special architectural historical, archaeological, artistic, cultural, scientific, social or technical interest, or an area that contributes to the appreciation of a Protected Structure”.

Architectural Conservation Areas within County Laois are identified in Volume 2 Settlement Plans of this CDP on the relevant settlement maps in the following settlements:

  • Abbeyleix
  • Ballinakill
  • Castletown
  • Clonaslee
  • Durrow
  • Portlaoise
  • Timahoe

The Council will examine the potential for designating additional ACAs within the County during the lifetime of this Plan. In considering the designation of additional ACAs, the Council will have regard to the following factors:

  • The sensitivity of areas of special interest to inappropriate development;
  • Availability of resources;
  • Local support for the designation;
  • National architectural heritage protection guidelines or government circulars.

Policy Objectives for ACA

ACA 1

Ensure that any development, modifications, alterations, or extensions within an ACA are sited and designed appropriately, and are not detrimental to the character of the structure or to its setting or the general character of the ACA and are in keeping with any Architectural Conservation Area Statement of Character Guidance Documents prepared for the relevant ACA.

ACA 2

Demolition of buildings or substantial parts of structures in cases where those structures make a positive contribution to the special character of the ACA will not be acceptable in principle. Only in exceptional circumstances, where the redevelopment or replacement structures would produce substantial benefits for the community which would decisively outweigh the loss resulting from demolition, would demolition of this nature be considered.

ACA 3

Investigate the designation of further ACAs at appropriate locations throughout  and prepare a character statement appraisal and area specific policy for each ACA to include Stradbally, Mountmellick Mountrath and Portarlington, (the latter in collaboration within Offaly County Council).

ACA Development Management Standard

DM ACA 1

DEVELOPMENT WITHIN AN ACA

Ensure that applications for new development within or affecting an ACA (infill development, conversions, alterations, extensions, shopfronts, advertisements) pay attention to detailed matters such as:

  • finishing materials;
  • rainwater goods;
  • fenestration details;
  • any external illumination;
  • scale, layout, built form, proportions; and
  • building lines and relationship of proposals to the site and surrounding area

The following information is required to be submitted with respect to applications for permission for restoration, refurbishment, demolition development or change of use of buildings /structures with Architectural Conservation Areas (ACA):

  • An Architectural Assessment Report as per the Architectural Heritage Protection: Guidelines for Planning Authorities” (2011) Department of the Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht, carried out by a suitably qualified person;
  • A comprehensive schedule of proposed work that follows the guidelines set out in the Architectural Heritage Protection: Guidelines for Planning Authorities” (2011) Department of the Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht.

12.3.3   VERNACULAR BUILDINGS

Vernacular architecture is the expression of the culture of a community and refers to the traditional building forms and types using local materials, skills and building techniques which form a vital component of the landscape. This includes traditional domestic buildings such as thatched cottages but also include other traditional structures such as shop fronts, farmsteads, outbuildings, aspects of the industrial past, including lime kilns, mills, forges and their products, such as gates. These structures reflect the unique local history and character of a place.

There are many traditional buildings in the Laois countryside with architectural heritage value which have been left to deteriorate and waste away. Traditional farm buildings can make a significant positive contribution to the Irish landscape. Many were laid out using local tried and tested materials, built to patterns and arrangements that made optimum use of resources. They reveal a great deal about the way the countryside has evolved and the changing fortunes of farming through the ages. A survey of thatched buildings was recently carried out which identified the remaining thatched dwellings within the county. In the interest of sustainability, it is considered that the re-use and adaption of existing buildings is preferable to their demolition and should be regarded as the first priority in any development project.

Policy Objectives for Vernacular Structures

VS 1

Recognise the importance of the contribution of vernacular architecture which may not be protected to the promote where feasible the protection, retention and appropriate revitalisation and use of the vernacular built heritage, including structures that contribute to landscape and streetscape character and discourage the demolition of these structures;

VS 2

Resist the demolition of vernacular architecture, in particular thatched cottages and farmhouses and to encourage their sensitive reuse having regard to the intrinsic character of the structure.

VS 3

Ensure that both new build, and extensions to vernacular buildings are of an appropriate design and do not detract from the buildings character.

VS 4

Seek the repair and retention of traditional timber and/or rendered shop fronts and pub fronts, including those that may not be protected structures.

VS 5

Develop and publish guidelines on the conservation and appropriate reuse of Local Authority Cottages and similar vernacular structures.

VS 6

Have regard, where appropriate, to guidance in the DAHG Guidelines and conservation best practice in assessing proposed interventions and planning applications relating to vernacular structures, traditional farmhouses, their curtilage, out buildings and settings.

Vernacular Structures Development Management Standards

DM VS 1

EXTENSION TO VERNACULAR STRUCTURES

All applications for extensions to vernacular structures shall comply with the following criteria:

  • High quality design which respects the character of the existing structure,
  • The quantity and quality of private open space that would remain to serve the house;
  • Extensions which break the existing front building line will not normally be acceptable. A porch extension which does not significantly break the front building line will normally be permitted;
  •  Extensions are subordinate to the existing dwelling with a presumption against the size of any extension exceeding 100% of the floor area of the existing dwelling.

12.3.4   HISTORIC GARDENS, COUNTRY HOUSES AND DEMESNES

County Laois has a rich heritage of country houses, gardens and designed landscaped gardens. They consist of private gardens, public parks and the landscapes associated with country estates and demesnes. These landscapes often include tree-lined avenues, formal ornamental woods, water-features, planned gardens, a bowling green, grass lawns, terraces and other formal features. In some cases, the house and buildings are gone, but the demesne and designed landscape remain. The two most notable houses and demesnes in the county are Emo House and Castle Durrow Demesne of which are accessible to the public.

Laois County Council recognises the importance of these historic houses, gardens and designed landscapes and their role in providing the setting for protected structures and thus seeks to ensure that they are properly protected from encroaching or adjacent development. The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage (NIAH) has conducted a field survey which has listed a number of historic gardens in County Laois such as Heywood Gardens near Ballinakill.

Policy Objectives for Historic Gardens, Country Houses and Demesnes

CH 1

Ensure that new development will not adversely affect the site, setting or views to and from historic gardens and designed landscapes.

CH 2

Require that any proposals for new development in an historic garden or demesne include an appraisal of the landscape, designed views and vistas, and an assessment of significant trees or groups of trees, as appropriate.

CH 3

Build on the information compiled as part of the National Survey of Historic Gardens & Designed Landscapes, and to carry out a survey to assess the intactness of these assets, including developing a strategy for their conservation, restoration and development.

CH 4

Assess the demesnes and historic designed landscapes within Laois and promote the conservation of their essential character, both built and natural, while allowing for appropriate re-use

12.4   ARCHAEOLOGICAL HERITAGE

Archaeology is an irreplaceable link with the past and is to be found in virtually every townland in County Laois.  Laois County Council recognises the importance of preserving and protecting this resource and fostering a greater public appreciation of it among both residents of the county and visitors. The archaeology of County Laois varies greatly in form, date and condition and includes structures, constructions, groups of buildings, developed sites, all recorded monuments as well as their contexts, and moveable objects, situated both on land and underwater.

Archaeological Heritage is comprised of:

  • Recorded sites and features of historical and archaeological importance included in the Record of Monuments and Places as established under Section 10 of the National Monuments (Amendment) Act,1994,
  • Major sites of archaeological importance in State Ownership or Guardianship (as outlined in Table 10.1).
  • National Monuments which are the subject of Preservation Orders in Laois (as outlined in Table 10.2).
  • All previously unknown archaeology that becomes known (e.g. through ground disturbance, fieldwork, or the discovery of sites underwater).

The Rock of Dunamaise is a site of particular historical, archaeological and cultural importance in County Laois. While the monument is owned by the State through the Office of Public Works (OPW), it is appropriate that the Plan sets out special measures to conserve and enhance this site, and to make it more accessible to the public. The Council is committed to the conservation of the Rock of Dunamaise and will work closely with DOAHRRGA to ensure its protection for future generations.

Similarly, the Fort Protector in Portlaoise town centre is a significant historical site in the County. It was built in 1547-48 as part of the suppression of the Gaelic Irish territories of the O’Moore and O’Connor clans. The plantation of Laois and Offaly followed shortly thereafter and was formalised in the creation of King’s County and Queen’s County in 1556. The Fort marks the foundation of the town of Portlaoise. Laois County Council was successful in obtaining funding from the Heritage Council and the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht under the new Historic Towns Initiative. The project funded will see the transformation of Fort Protector and Fitzmaurice Place at the historic core of the town, over several phases to create a new Heritage Quarter for the town.

The industrial archaeology of Laois was the subject of a survey by the Laois Heritage Forum in 2003. The results of this survey and future field surveys will be used to inform the implementation of the County Development Plan and the formulation of future policies. Laois County Council will afford appropriate protection to such industrial archaeological sites as may come to light following future surveys. In considering the protection of the industrial heritage of the county ancillary heritage such as millraces will also be protected.

12.4.1 THE RECORD OF MONUMENTS AND PLACES

The Record of Monument and Places (RMP) is a statutory audit of archaeological monuments provided for in the National Monuments Acts. It consists of a county by county set of marked-up Ordnance Survey maps and a manual listing basic information in relation to each monument or area included in the RMP. Monuments in the RMP are protected under the National Monuments (Amendment) Act 1994. The RMP is revised periodically.

Table 10.1: National Monuments in State Care in Laois

DESCRIPTION

TOWNLAND

RMP NUMBER

NATIONAL MONUMENT NUMBER

Ringfort

Aghnahilly

LA013-063

540

Ringfort

Coorlaghan

LA037-002

567

Castle

Dunamase

LA013-052

615

Church & Cross

Errill, Ballagharahin

LA027-024-, LA027-025

113

Church

Fossy Lower

LA019-016

114

Church

Killeshin

LA032-020002

115

Church & Crosses

Sleaty

LA032-018001-,LA032-018003-, LA032-018007-

116

Church & Round Tower

Timahoe

LA018-031002-,LA018-031005

114

Table 10.2: Monuments protected by Preservation Orders in County Laois

PRESERVATION ORDER  NO

MONUMENT NAME

RMP NUMBER

TOWNLAND

EFFECTIVE DATE

3/95

Clogrennan

LA034-008---

Clogrennan

1995

197

Lamberton Fort

LA018-010---

Lamberton Demesne

1957

190

Motte

LA024-006001-

Ballyroan

1952

4/81

Motte & Bailey

LA024-015001

LA024-015002-

Ballinclogh

1981

9/77

Ringfort

LA028-011---

Garryduff

1977

12.4.2  ZONES OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL POTENTIAL

Historic Towns which have been identified by the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government for general protection are towns which were first identified in the Urban Archaeological Survey of Laois and which have been included in the RMP. Within Laois these historic towns include Ballinakill, Castletown, Dunamase, Killaban, Portarlington and Portlaoise. The guideline boundaries for these towns are illustrated within the RMP.

The areas within the historic boundaries are known as Zones of Archaeological Potential, and are areas where intense archaeology is present. The following zones of archaeological potential have been identified by the Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government, and are detailed of the settlement maps for the following settlements:

  • Ballinakill
  • Castletown
  • Dunamaise
  • Killabban
  • Portarlington
  • Portlaoise

Any proposed development (due to its location, size or nature) with the potential to affect the archaeological heritage resource will be subject to an Archaeological Impact Assessment. This includes proposals close to archaeological monuments, extensive in area) or length and development that requires an Environmental Impact Assessment. Other areas of high archaeological potential may exist outside the boundaries of conventionally recognised monuments especially in wetlands and former wetlands.

Policy Objectives for Archaeological Heritage

AH 1

Manage development in a manner that protects and conserves the integrity and character of archaeological heritage of the county which avoids adverse impacts on sites, monuments, settings, features or objects of significant historical or archaeological interest and secure the preservation in-situ or by record of all sites and features of historical and archaeological interest.

AH 2

Support the preservation or conservation of historically significant street patterns, building lines and plot widths in its towns and villages as well as the preservation of features such as town walls, historic revetments, and public realm features such as granite kerbing, historic drinking fountains, cobbles, vent pipes whether or not they benefit from protection in their own right.

AH 3

Protect the intrinsic value, character, integrity and settings of monuments and places in the Record of Monuments and Places (RMPs) and any forthcoming statutory register and protect Zones of Archaeological Potential against inappropriate development.

AH 4

In areas of archaeological potential, where groundworks are proposed, ensure that all works are undertaken to the highest standard and the resultant information made publicly available. Developers will be required to have regard to Archaeology and Development: Guidelines for Good Practice for Developers (ICOMOS, 2000) in planning and executing development in sensitive areas. The Council favours the preservation in-situ of archaeological remains, where areas of archaeological potential are located in town centres or villages, preservation of archaeological remains by record will be considered.

AH 5

Encourage, where practicable, the provision of public access and signage to sites identified in the Record of Monuments and Places under the direct ownership, guardianship or control of the Council and/or the State.

AH 6

Work closely with the relevant State bodies to deliver the conservation objectives of the Rock of Dunamase and redevelopment of Fort Protector to secure funding for the preservation and development of these culturally important sites.

AH 7

Require visual impact statements for developments within the area around the Rock of Dunamaise in order to assess the potential impacts of development in the area.

AH 8

Work with stakeholders including the OPW, the Heritage Council, the Arts Council, local communities, Bord Failte and businesses to support the development of heritage and cultural tourism in County Laois .

AH 9

Maximise the potential of Dunrally Viking Fort, as a heritage/cultural and tourism site.

AH 10

Protect where appropriate industrial heritage structures or elements of significance identified in the Laois Industrial Archaeology Survey by adding them to the Record of Protected Structures during the lifetime of the Development Plan.

DM Standard for Archaeological Heritage

DM AH 1

ARCHAEOLOGICAL POTENTIAL

In areas of archaeological potential, where groundworks are proposed, the Council favours the preservation in-situ of archaeological remains, where areas of archaeological potential are located in town centres or villages, preservation of archaeological remains by record will be considered.

Where it is proposed to undertake groundworks to lands within an area of archaeological potential or in the vicinity of Recorded Monuments or Zones of Archaeological Potential, the Council will require the preparation of an archaeological field evaluation by a licensed archaeologist, the details of which will be submitted with a planning application. Such development shall be assessed in the context of the following documents:-

  • Accord with the Framework and Principles for the Protection of Archaeological Heritage (DoAHG, 1999).
  • The National Monuments Acts 1934-1994.
  • Heritage Council’s Archaeology and Archaeology and Development Guidelines for Good Practice for Developers (2000).

Map 12.1 Portlaoise Archaeological Significance Zone